Emergency Department/Trauma

About Emergency Department/Trauma

California’s emergency departments (EDs) provide critical health services to those experiencing trauma, injury, or acute medical conditions. EDs offer comprehensive care, do not require previous authorization, and are open 24/7 year-round. EDs are facing unprecedented patient volume, with a 42% increase in the past seven years. By improving access to care for primary and specialty services, emergency visits can be reduced. More focused state and federal policies will be required to reduce Californians’ health care risks and ensure equitable access to appropriate care levels before people need emergency care.

CHA Emergency Services Forum Discussed Patient Volume, Regulations, and Innovation

What’s happening: CHA hosted the 2024 Emergency Services Forum on May 6 in Newport Beach, California. The forum covered an array of topics, including compliance with legislation, regulating ambulance patient offload time, the impact of recent changes in the behavioral health system on emergency departments (EDs), and a keynote address by RaDonda Vaught, a nurse who was convicted of negligent homicide after accidentally giving a patient the wrong medication.   

What else to know: The forum saw a record attendance of 156 attendees this year, a capacity crowd of professionals and providers from around the state. The gathering provided clarity on laws that affect EDs, previewed upcoming regulations, and provided ED personnel the opportunity to discuss prehospital challenges. Those in attendance said it was a reminder there is a resilient community to lean on.  

CHA to Host ED Resource Relief – Implementing the CARE Act Webinar

What’s happening: CHA will host a webinar on May 10 at 9 a.m. (PT) about a new option for hospitals to connect frequent users of emergency departments (EDs) and inpatient psychiatric services to the help they need: the Community, Assistance, Recovery & Empowerment (CARE) Act. 

What else to know: The webinar is free for CHA members, and registration is required.  

CHA Analysis Reveals How Insurer Practices Impede Patient Care

What’s happening: CHA developed a detailed analysis of how insurance company practices negatively affect patients, which is a key proof point supporting a comprehensive strategy to hold insurers accountable for patient care in California. 
 
What else to know: One of CHA’s priorities this year is to create greater accountability (network adequacy, prior authorization, medical necessity, payment practices, and parity) for insurers operating in California.  

2024 Emergency Services Forum

Join us for the 2024 Emergency Services Forum in beautiful Newport Beach. This conference is dedicated to the uniqueness of hospital ED management and its intersection with emergency services and the community.

2023 PG&E Community Wildfire Safety Program: Information for Hospitals

The Healthcare Energy Fitness Initiative (HEFI) is a comprehensive energy efficiency solution designed to support PG&E health care customers save money by optimizing their energy performance. This unique program provides no-cost expert technical services, end-to-end project support, and lucrative financial incentives to qualifying customers.

Register for this webinar and learn how a team of experienced energy experts and highly qualified Delivery Partners, along with your PG&E Account Manager, will help projects get identified, approved, funded, and completed so you can focus on delivering patient care.

The Hitches and Glitches of AB 2275 – LPS 5150 Involuntary Treatment

While Assembly Bill (AB) 2275 went into law six months ago, interpretations on implementing changes vary among counties, and many unanswered questions remain in emergency departments across the state. Join CHA to hear what the law requires, what Lanterman-Petris Short (LPS) Act patients’ rights come into play, and how to engage community partners to successfully […]

Treating Opioid Use Disorder in Acute Care Hospitals

Overview

Opioid abuse is a long-standing problem in California.
The substance use disorder (SUD) crisis might seem insurmountable, but the CA Bridge Program has developed a model of care that saves lives and helps patients with SUDs get back on track. The 24/7 program is built upon three pillars: rapid access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT), welcoming and destigmatized care and specially trained substance use navigators (SUNs) that connect patients to ongoing care and support.