Behavioral Health

About Behavioral Health

An estimated 7.5 million people in California experience a mental health disorder in any given year, but only one-third of adults who experience mental illness are getting treatment due to a lack of behavioral health care workers. Despite major improvements in health care coverage over the past decade, substantial discrepancies persist in available behavioral health care among commercial health plans and public programs. For this reason, many people experiencing mental health crises frequently turn to hospital emergency departments for treatment, and this number is increasing. From 2011 to 2020, there was a 68% increase. Caregivers at hospitals know the obstacles people with behavioral health conditions face and the challenges in getting them treatment and embrace the essential role they play in helping those in crisis. Strategies must mirror those in primary health care where the goal is prevention and early intervention, along with offering a continuum of services that will help Californians with behavioral health needs avoid acute care, hospitalization, incarceration, conservatorships, and institutionalization.  

A Safe, Welcoming Space for Behavioral Health Patients

Gone are the dreary psychiatric facilities with sterile interiors and small windows. With large windows and white-oak floors, the new home of UCSF’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences aims to promote transparency and normalize mental health care.  

Important Legal Changes to Psychiatric Holds in 2023

This webinar will provide a review of new state laws affecting all hospitals that treat patients on an involuntary psychiatric hold including hospital emergency departments and inpatient psychiatric services. It will describe the intersection of hospital EMTALA requirements and the involuntary psychiatric hold process. Audience:Health Care Executives, Case Managers, Social Workers, Risk Managers, Emergency Department […]