Bill Tracker

Legislature: The Bill Tracker includes legislation CHA monitored during the 2022 legislative session, which adjourned on Aug. 31. The 2023-24 session will convene on Dec. 5, after which the Legislature will break until January 2023.  

Not Passed

Placed on the Senate inactive file on Aug. 23.

AB 2680 (Arambula, D-Fresno)

Follow

AB 2680 would create the Community Health Navigator Program to make direct grants to community-based organizations to conduct targeted outreach, enrollment, retention, and access activities for Medi-Cal-eligible individuals and families. The bill would establish the framework for the program.

Vetoed by the governor on Sept. 27.

AB 2077 (Calderon, D-Whittier)

Support

AB 2077 would have increased the individual monthly maintenance amount for personal and incidental needs from $35 to $80 in the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly organization.

In the Assembly

ACA 11 (Kalra, D-San Jose)

Oppose

ACA 11 would impose an excise tax, payroll taxes, and a state personal income tax at specified rates to create the CALCare fund, which will support comprehensive universal single-payer health care coverage. The fund will also support a health care cost control system for the benefit of every resident of the state, as well as reserves deemed necessary to ensure payment, to be established in statute. The measure would authorize the Legislature to increase these tax rates by a statute passed by majority vote of both houses of the Legislature.

Held on the Senate Appropriations Committee suspense file on Aug. 11.

AB 1995 (Arambula, D-Fresno)

Follow

AB 1995 would have eliminated the premiums and subscriber contributions for pregnant women or women in their postpartum period, children under age 2, and certain employed persons with disabilities in the Medi-Cal program. 

AB 1214 will not proceed this year.

AB 1214 (Waldron, R-Escondido)

Support

AB 1214 would have made an individual who is incarcerated in a state prison or county jail eligible for the Medi-Cal program for 30 days before the date they are released.

Passed

Signed by the governor on Sept. 14.

SB 1338 Umberg (D-Santa Ana) and Eggman (D-Stockton)

Support

SB 1338 is the legislative vehicle to establish Governor Newsom’s proposed Community Assistance, Recovery, and Empowerment (CARE) Court program. A variety of individuals and agencies, including hospitals, are authorized to file a petition to begin CARE Court proceedings for an individual who may be eligible for the program (i.e., over age 18, diagnosis of schizophrenia spectrum or other psychotic disorder, not currently stabilized in ongoing voluntary treatment, unlikely to survive safely in the community and condition is substantially deteriorating). County behavioral health departments will develop treatment and housing plans for eligible participants that will be supervised by the civil courts and established in consultation with the participants, their counsel, and a trained supporter. Individuals’ participation in the program is voluntary and lasts a maximum of two years. SB 1338 permits a court to fine a county up to $1,000 per day for noncompliance with providing CARE services to program participants, as well as to appoint a receiver to secure court-ordered care for participants, at the county’s cost.

Signed by the governor on Sept. 30.

AB 2275 (Wood, D-Santa Rosa)

Neutral as Amended

This bill specifies that the 72 hours of detention under a 5150 involuntary hold begins at the time the person is first detained. It requires that a certification review hearing be held within seven days of the date on which a person was initially detained and for contact to be made with the patients’ rights advocate if a person has not been released from a 5150 within 72 hours.

Signed by the governor on Sept. 30.

AB 2242 (Santiago, D-Los Angeles)

Support

Among other provisions, AB 2242 requires individuals released from an involuntary psychiatric hold to receive care coordination plans and follow-up engagement for voluntary outpatient services.

Signed by the governor on July 19.

AB 1394 (Irwin, D-Thousand Oaks)

Support

AB 1394 requires general acute care hospitals to have policies and procedures in place for screening patients ages 12 years and older for suicide risk. CHA is pleased the author accepted our requested amendments, which moved the age from 8 years old to 12 years old and reference the existing guidance on suicide risk published by The Joint Commission.

Not Passed

Held on the Assembly Appropriations Committee suspense file on Aug. 11.

SB 1154 (Eggman, D-Stockton)

Support if Amended

SB 1154 would have required the California Department of Public Health to develop, by Jan. 1, 2024, a real-time, internet-based database to collect, aggregate, and display information about available beds to treat those in mental health or substance use disorder crisis. It would also have required the database to include a minimum of specific information, including the contact information for a facility’s designated employee, and have the capacity to, among other things, enable searches to identify beds that are appropriate for the treatment of individuals in a mental health or substance use disorder crisis.

Placed on the Assembly inactive file on Aug. 30.

SB 749 (Glazer, D-Orinda)

Support

SB 749 is a transparency measure that would require the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission, in consultation with state and local mental health authorities and upon appropriation by the Legislature, to create a comprehensive tracking program for county spending on mental and behavioral health programs and services, including funding sources, funding utilization, and outcome data at the program, service, and statewide levels.

SB 516 will not proceed this year.

SB 516 (Eggman, D-Stockton)

Oppose

SB 516 would have allowed information about the medical status of a person with mental illness to be considered by the officer presiding over a 14-day involuntary psychiatric hold certification hearing. While CHA supports the goal of meeting the primary care and mental health needs of all Californians, we believe the bill is unnecessary and could be counterproductive. Psychiatric inpatient hospitals and physicians working in those hospitals do not always have ready access to current or previous information related to a patient’s physical health conditions. Further, accessing these records and coordinating with the appropriate physicians takes time and is unlikely to be accomplished within the time frame for the courts. The Psychiatric Physicians Alliance of California is the sponsor of the bill.

Passed

Signed by the governor on Sept. 29.

Budget Trailer Bills

In the closing days of the 2022 session, the Legislature passed 13 additional budget trailer bills to finalize actions related to the state budget. This package of bills includes the following items of interest:

AB 152 (Committee on Budget)

Extends COVID-19 supplemental paid sick leave to Dec. 31, 2022, which was set to expire on Sept. 30, 2022. Under existing law, if an employee is receiving additional supplemental paid sick leave, then an employer may require the employee to submit to a second diagnostic test on or after the fifth day after the first positive test that entitled the employee to the additional supplemental paid sick leave and provide documentation of those results. This bill further authorizes the employer to require, if that second diagnostic test for COVID-19 is also positive, the employee to submit to a third diagnostic test within no less than 24 hours and requires the employer to provide the second and third diagnostic tests at no cost to the employee. Finally, the bill specifies that the employer has no obligation to provide additional COVID-19 supplemental paid sick leave for employees who refuse to submit to these aforementioned tests.


AB 204 — Health Omnibus (Committee on Budget)

  • Makes changes to the Office of Health Care Affordability to clarify that the cost targets must be adjusted when labor costs go up, rather than making adjustments based on labor costs on a case-by-case basis.
  • Adds postgraduate nurse practitioner and physician assistant training programs to the Song-Brown Healthcare Workforce Training Program, consistent with funding provided in the 2022 Budget Act.
  • Establishes a clinic workforce stabilization retention payment program up to $1,000 for eligible workers in qualified clinics, including but not limited to federally qualified health centers and rural health clinics.
  • Adds the County Children’s Health Insurance Program to the Medi-Cal programs for which children zero to four years of age will remain continuously eligible.
  • Eliminates Medi-Cal copayments.

AB 160 (Committee on Budget)

Requires, beginning July 1, 2024, general acute care hospitals to display in their emergency departments a poster developed by the Victims Compensation Board (VCB) describing the Victim’s Assistance and Compensation Program administered by VCB and the procedures for obtaining compensation under the program.  Requires VCB to provide to each hospital the poster and applications forms to distribute to crime victims or their family members who may seek compensation from the program.

Behavioral Health Investments

Support

The budget agreement includes $1.5 billion for bridge housing for individuals with serious mental illness who are experiencing homelessness. It also includes funding to implement Community Assistance, Recovery, and Empowerment (CARE) Court, which is contingent upon a final agreement on its authorizing legislation.

Medi-Cal for All

Support

The budget agreement approves the expansion of comprehensive Medi-Cal coverage to Californians ages 26-49, regardless of immigration status, starting no later than Jan. 1, 2024. With this change, all undocumented residents otherwise eligible for Medi-Cal will be eligible for comprehensive coverage.

Hospital and Nursing Facility Worker Retention Payments

Support

In May, Gov. Newsom proposed that the state allocate $933 million to provide hospital and nursing facility workers with retention payments. While the initial language created implementation and administration questions, CHA worked closely with the administration and organized labor to resolve those issues. The budget plan includes $1.077 billion in funding that would provide a base payment of $1000 for full-time employees, $750 for part-time employees, and $1,000 for physicians who work in hospitals. Additionally, the state will match up to $500 any optional bonus or COVID-19-related payments paid by covered entities from Dec. 1, 2021 through Dec. 31, 2022. More information.

Community Health Workers (Department of Health Care Access and Information)

Support

The final budget includes investment for the development and implementation of the Workforce for a Healthy California for All Program, which, among other things, would assist to recruit, train, and certify 25,000 new community health workers by 2025 in partnership with the Department of Health Care Access and Information and the Department of Health Care Services.

Supporting the Health Care Workforce

Support

To address California’s acute shortage of health care professionals, the state budget plan increases investments in workforce development for behavioral health, public health, primary care, clinic, and reproductive health. CHA advocated for these supports last fall and is pleased to see them included in the final budget. More information.

Office of Health Care Affordability

The 2022-23 budget agreement approved by the Legislature and expected to be signed by the governor establishes the Office of Health Care Affordability and authorizes funding for the Department of Health Care Access and Information to set up the office. The office will oversee health care cost growth in California through public reporting and by setting and enforcing cost-growth targets statewide, for individual health care sectors and geographic regions, and potentially for individual health care entities. In addition, the office will prospectively review market transactions that include investor-owned health care providers. It will also measure and promote investments in primary care and behavioral health, the adoption of alternative payment methodologies, workforce stability, and performance by health care providers and payers on a standard set of equity and quality measurements. Review indicates that the final language addresses many of our key framework concerns, and we will continue to engage on this issue as the office is established. More information.

Not Passed

GME Program

Support

To help address the state’s dire health care workforce shortage, CHA proposed that the state expand the Medi-Cal graduate medical education (GME) program to include all eligible hospitals, not just the designated public hospitals, and invest ongoing state general funds to support Medi-Cal GME. More information.

Medi-Cal Program

Support

CHA is requesting equitable access to care for Medi-Cal beneficiaries. Systemic underfunding means that those who care for Medi-Cal patients are reimbursed just 74 cents on the dollar for the cost of care. This results in fewer resources for care in California’s most vulnerable communities. We will never make progress toward health equity in our state if Medi-Cal continues to underfund care for those with the greatest needs. CHA proposed that the state replace the policy that froze hospital APR-DRG rates at 2012-13 levels; create new, annual payment adjustments to account for the social and environmental challenges patients may be experiencing; and convert public hospitals’ Medi-Cal fee-for-service inpatient reimbursement to a value-based structure that includes state general fund support. More information.

Community Benefits Requirements

Oppose

The governor’s budget proposed requiring hospitals that provide community benefits to dedicate 25% to community-based organizations for activities to address the social determinants of health. The budget agreement rejected this proposal.

Passed

Governor Newsom signed AB 35 on May 23.

AB 35 Reyes (D-Grand Terrace)

Support

Stakeholders have reached a legislative compromise to adjust the Medical Injury Compensation Reform Act’s cap on non-economic damages, which is currently limited to $250,000. AB 35 is the vehicle that will implement the compromise, thus avoiding an expensive ballot battle heading into November. This new law will increase the existing limit to $350,000 for non-death cases and $500,000 for wrongful death cases on the effective date Jan. 1, 2023, followed by incremental increases over 10 years to $750,000 for non-death cases and $1,000,000 for wrongful death cases, after which a 2% annual inflationary adjustment will apply. In addition, the proposal will also create three separate categories of caps that could apply, depending on the facts of each case. A health care provider or health care institution can only be held liable for damages under one category, regardless of how the categories are applied or combined.

Not Passed

Failed to pass the Assembly on Aug. 31.

SB 260 (Wiener, D-San Francisco)

Follow - Hot

SB 260 would require any business or corporation with more than $1 billion in total annual revenues that do business in California to publicly disclose their Scope 1, Scope 2, and Scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions annually to an emissions registry beginning in 2025.

Passed

Signed by the governor on Sept. 29.

AB 204 — Health Omnibus Budget Trailer Bill

Among other provisions, AB 204 establishes a clinic workforce stabilization retention payment program up to $1,000 for eligible workers in qualified clinics, including but not limited to federally qualified health centers and rural health clinics.

Passed

Signed by the governor on Sept. 29.

SB 1139 (Kamlager, D-Los Angeles)

Follow

SB 1139 requires the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to make emergency phone calls available from hospitalized incarcerated individuals to people on their approved visitor list, including their medical power of attorney and next of kin.

Passed

Signed by the governor on Sept. 29.

AB 160 (Committee on Budget)

AB 160 requires, beginning July 1, 2024, general acute care hospitals to display in their emergency departments a poster developed by the Victims Compensation Board (VCB) describing the Victim’s Assistance and Compensation Program administered by VCB and the procedures for obtaining compensation under the program. Requires VCB to provide to each hospital the poster and applications forms to distribute to crime victims or their family members who may seek compensation from the program.

Not Passed

SB 958 will not proceed this year.

SB 958 (Limón, D-Goleta and Portantino, D-La Cañada Flintridge)

Cosponsor

SB 958 would have prevented health plans from refusing to cover infused and injected medications that the health care provider has in stock, if required for patient safety or medication integrity.The bill will not be moving forward this year. However, we will continue to explore options for ensuring that our patients who need infused and injectable medications have access to timely, safe, and high-quality care.

Not Passed

AB 2080 will not proceed this year.

AB 2080 (Wood, D-Santa Rosa)

Oppose Through Coalition

AB 2080 would have created the Health Care Consolidation and Contracting Fairness Act of 2022, pertaining to contracts issued, amended, or renewed on or after Jan. 1, 2023, between a health plan or insurer and a health care provider or facility. It would have prohibited these contracts from containing terms that — among other things — restrict the payer from steering patients to other providers or facilities, or that require the payer to contract with other affiliated providers or facilities. AB 2080 also would have created additional attorney general oversight for transactions undertaken by investor-owned hospitals, county and district hospitals, skilled-nursing facilities, medical groups, payers, and pharmacy benefit managers. The bill also would have expanded the Department of Managed Health Care’s authority over health plan mergers and acquisitions.

Passed

Signed by the governor on Sept. 29.

AB 152 (Committee on Budget)

Extends COVID-19 supplemental paid sick leave to Dec. 31, 2022, which was set to expire on Sept. 30, 2022. Under existing law, if an employee is receiving additional supplemental paid sick leave, then an employer may require the employee to submit to a second diagnostic test on or after the fifth day after the first positive test that entitled the employee to the additional supplemental paid sick leave and provide documentation of those results. This bill further authorizes the employer to require, if that second diagnostic test for COVID-19 is also positive, the employee to submit to a third diagnostic test within no less than 24 hours and requires the employer to provide the second and third diagnostic tests at no cost to the employee. Finally, the bill specifies that the employer has no obligation to provide additional COVID-19 supplemental paid sick leave for employees who refuse to submit to these aforementioned tests.

Signed by the governor on Sept. 27.

SB 1162 (Limón, D-Santa Barbara)

Oppose Through Coalition

SB 1162 requires private employers with more than 100 employees to submit a pay data report to the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing, including employers with more than 100 employees hired through a labor contractor. The bill also requires employers to furnish the pay scale for an employee’s position upon their request and include the pay scale in any job posting for employers with 15 or more employees. Amendments deleted the requirement that the Department of Fair Employment and Housing make these data available to the public.

Signed by the governor on Sept. 18.

AB 2188 (Quirk, D-Hayward)

Follow - Hot

AB 2188 prohibits employers from discriminating against employees or job applicants for using cannabis off the job and away from work, including the discovery of nonpsychoactive cannabis metabolites in their urine, hair, or bodily fluids.

Signed by the governor on Sept. 29.

SB 1334 (Bradford, D-Gardena)

Neutral

SB 1334 extends existing meal and rest period requirements — and liability under the Private Attorneys General Act for failing to provide meal and rest periods — to public sector health care workers. The bill exempts employers and employees covered under a collective bargaining agreement.

Signed by the governor on Sept. 29.

SB 1044 (Durazo, D-Los Angeles)

Neutral as Amended

During a state or local emergency, SB 1044 prohibits employers from taking or threatening any adverse action against employees for not reporting to or leaving work and prohibits employers from not allowing employees to access or use their phones during the emergency. With amendments exempting hospital workers, CHA is neutral.

Signed by the governor on Sept. 29.

SB 931 (Leyva, D-San Bernardino)

Oppose

SB 931 authorizes labor unions to bring claims to the Public Employment Relations Board against a public employer for allegations that they are deterring union membership. It subjects employers to civil penalties up to $1,000 per violation per affected employee and up to $100,000 in total.

Not Passed

Vetoed by the governor on Sept. 23.

AB 858 (Jones-Sawyer, D-Los Angeles)

Neutral as Amended

AB 858 would have prohibited discrimination against hospital workers who, after receiving appropriate permission, override health information technology and clinical practice guidelines. With the set of amendments that included an exemption from the Private Attorneys General Act, CHA removed its opposition.

Passed

Signed by the governor on Sept. 19.

SB 979 (Dodd, D-Napa)

Sponsor

SB 979 streamlines the process for critical state agencies to respond and support the health care delivery system when the governor or the state public health officer declares a state of emergency.

Passed

Signed by the governor on Sept. 27.

SB 1375 (Atkins, D-San Diego)

Follow

Due to concerns from legislators, the sections of the bill related to transition to practice (TTP) were removed. These sections would have permitted a nurse practitioner (NP) who has been practicing a minimum of three years as of Jan. 1, 2023, to satisfy the TTP requirements under AB 890 (Wood, Ch. 2020) in order to practice independently without physician supervision. With the removal of these sections, the bill now solely specifies when NPs can perform first trimester abortions and expands training options for NPs seeking to perform the procedure. Pro Tem Atkins has committed to shifting her focus to the Board of Registered Nursing to ensure the timely development of favorable TTP regulations that are in alignment with the intent of AB 890. 

Passed

Signed by the governor on Sept. 27.

AB 2185 (Weber, D-San Diego)

Neutral as Amended

AB 2185 requires that victims of domestic violence be allowed to have a social worker, victim advocate, or support person present — if available — during a forensic medical examination. The bill also makes changes to the forensic exam documentation forms and requires facilities conducting forensic exams to develop policies and procedures to maintain the confidentiality of forensic exam reports. In addition, the bill requires costs associated with the forensic exam to be separate from costs for treatment for injuries, and costs for the forensic exam not be charged to the victim. Costs associated with medical exams will be reimbursed through the California Office of Emergency Services, which will establish a flat reimbursement rate that must be “fair and reasonable.”

Passed

Signed by the governor on Sept. 27

AB 1882 (R. Rivas, D-Hollister)

Neutral as Amended

AB 1882 requires hospitals to report to their local governments the seismic rating of their hospital buildings and progress toward meeting the 2030 seismic requirements. CHA had concerns about some of the reporting requirements in the bill. Amendments were secured to address these concerns.

Not Passed

Held on the Assembly Appropriations Committee suspense file on Aug. 11.

SB 1339 (Pan, D-Sacramento)

Support if Amended

SB 1339 would have required hospitals with structural performance category 2 buildings to provide the location of each service in that building. In addition, hospitals would have needed to provide a cost estimate for meeting the 2030 requirement to the Department of Health Care Access and Information. The department would then have provided the Legislature with an assessment of the total projected costs for hospitals to meet the 2030 seismic requirements.

Passed

Signed by the governor on July 19.

AB 2148 (Calderon, D-Whittier)

Support Through Coalition

AB 2148 extends existing law that gives employers authorization to deposit indemnity workers’ compensation payments in a prepaid card account until Jan. 1, 2024.

Signed by the governor on Sept. 30.

AB 1681 (Daly, D-Anaheim)

Follow

AB 1681 allows the district attorney to meet with insurance companies and self-insured employers to discuss suspected insurance fraud.

Signed by the governor on Sept. 29.

AB 1751 (Daly, D-Anaheim)

Neutral as Amended

AB 1751 extends until Jan. 1, 2024, the sunset date for the workers’ compensation presumption for COVID-19 that was signed by the governor in 2020.

Signed by the governor on Sept. 29.

SB 1127 (Atkins, D-San Diego)

Oppose Through Coalition

SB 1127 shortens the time frame — from 90 to 75 days after knowledge of an injury — for employers to reject a workers’ compensation claim. Amendments also reduced the previous penalties in the bill from a cap of $100,000 to a cap of $50,000 for delays caused by unreasonably rejected claims.

Not Passed

Failed to pass Assembly Insurance Committee on June 22 and will not proceed this year.

SB 213 (Cortese, D-Silicon Valley)

Oppose

SB 213 would have created a rebuttable presumption in the workers’ compensation system that an infectious disease, respiratory disease, cancer, PTSD, musculoskeletal injury, or respiratory disease arose out of work for any hospital direct patient care worker.

Passed

Supporting the Health Care Workforce

Support

To address California’s acute shortage of health care professionals, the state budget plan increases investments in workforce development for behavioral health, public health, primary care, clinic, and reproductive health. CHA advocated for these supports last fall and is pleased to see them included in the final budget. More information.