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PG&E to Hold Wildfire Safety Webinar for Hospitals

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As previously reported in CHA News, extreme weather and wildfire threats may result in public safety power shutoffs by PG&E. To prepare for these power outages, hospitals can take part in PG&E’s Wildfire Safety webinar for hospitals, scheduled for June 7 from 9-10 a.m. (PT). 

Volunteers Needed for Quality Improvement Project on Medication Profiles for High-Risk Patients

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Under Senate Bill 1254 (Chapter 697, Statutes of 2018), hospitals must establish criteria for high-risk patients and complete a medication profile for those patients. To better understand how this new requirement will impact patient safety, CHA and California Health System Pharmacists members will undertake a six-week, multi-center quality improvement project. 

Hospitals Unite to Combat Violence in National Day of Awareness

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This Friday, hospitals nationwide will support #HAVhope Friday, a digital media campaign to focus national attention on preventing and ending violence. Sponsored by the American Hospital Association (AHA), the initiative shines a light on how hospitals, health systems, and their caregivers work every day to end violence in their communities and protect their employees from workplace violence.

Hospitals Encouraged to Respond to AHA Price Transparency Survey

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The American Hospital Association (AHA) has released a survey on price transparency that is intended to foster understanding of how hospitals develop and implement patient-facing price transparency tools. CHA encourages all AHA-member hospitals to respond to the survey by the June 14 deadline, and to include their hospital name so that the data can be appropriately analyzed.

Supreme Court Rejects Medicare Disproportionate Share Hospital Cuts

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The Supreme Court ruled this week that the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) violated the Medicare Act when, in 2014, it changed the calculation for payments to disproportionate share hospitals (DSH). The 7-1 court ruling could affect billions of dollars in Medicare payments to safety net hospitals.

Are vaccines safe? What you need to know about mercury, aluminum and other ‘toxins’

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There is a concept in toxicology that originated from Paracelsus and is paraphrased as “The dose makes the poison.”

It reminds us that all chemicals can be toxic to humans, depending on the dose. Water can kill you if you drink more than your body can handle. Even table salt is deadly if the dose ingested is high enough.

It is also important to understand that the ability to produce toxicity has nothing to do with whether a chemical is natural or synthetic (man-made).

New budget omits an important piece of California’s disaster preparedness

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California’s 70 emergency air ambulance helicopters and airplanes cover nearly 164,000 square miles and serve more than 37 million Californians in their time of need.

To protect newborns and their mothers, air ambulances evacuated an entire neonatal unit at a Redding Hospital and transported the patients to UC Davis Medical Center in Sacramento during devastating Carr Fire in 2018. Air ambulances fly injured firefighters and residents to burn centers to receive the urgent, life-saving care they needed.

Inexplicably, the state budget process has left out support for air ambulance. The emergency services provided by air ambulances could disappear if a funding stream that expires at the end of this year is not replaced in the pending state budget.

Why does California’s public health department treat CBD like poison?

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U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell — the nation’s second most powerful Republican — and California’s Democratic state legislators completely agree on one thing: Marijuana’s cousin hemp should be fully legalized.

As the late U.S. House Speaker Tip O’Neill famously said: “All politics is local.”

In McConnell’s home state of Kentucky, tobacco farming is dying out. Farmers are desperate for a replacement crop. And hemp is their choice for the future.

In California, farmers also need a new crop that doesn’t use much water. That’s hemp.

I had a good job and insurance — but high health care costs still drove me to bankruptcy

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Many Americans assume that if they have a good job, they’ll have a good health care plan. And if they have insurance, they assume that they are immune from the health care debate. In reality, many of us are just one major illness away from financial devastation. I know, I’ve been there.

About a decade ago, I was severely injured after I was run off the road by a vehicle while riding my bicycle. The injury caused a series of health issues resulting in more than $50,000 worth of medical bills that I was responsible for paying, despite having good health insurance and financial security. That was $50,000 beyond my premiums, deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums that I already paid. In my case, my injury slowed my ability to work, generate income for my business, and keep up with prescription medications, follow-up procedures and large deductibles.