Workforce

About Workforce

California’s shortage of health care workers, which was already struggling to keep pace with the growing demand for services before the pandemic, has only been exacerbated by COVID-19. Statewide, more than 11 million Californians live in an area without enough primary care providers. These patients often face a health care system lacking enough nurses, physicians, pharmacists, behavioral health professionals, lab scientists, geriatric specialists, and physical therapists to provide the care they need. To care for patients across the state, California needs to add 500,000 new allied health care professionals — such as medical assistants, imaging specialists, and other non-nursing staff — by 2024.   

Health care offers Californians solid career paths with upward mobility and economic stability, and each year hospitals invest millions of dollars in training California’s next generation of health care providers. But closing the gaps will require partnerships among all who recognize the need to protect the health of Californians: employers, workers, policymakers, colleges, licensing entities, and others. Regulatory changes are needed to improve efficiency and transparency in licensing, address limitations on scope of practice, and enhance education and training for nurses and nurse assistants.  

Work to Address Staffing Agency Concerns Advances

Amid the largest surge in cases since the pandemic began — with record numbers of patients needing hospital care and untold numbers of health care workers falling ill with COVID-19 each day — the demand for travel staff, nurses in particular, has never been higher. 

Budget Proposal Offers Solid Start to Rebuild Health Care System

For all of you who are on the front lines working extraordinary hours to respond to the unbelievable spread of omicron over the past several weeks, it might have been easy to overlook the Monday release of Gov. Gavin Newsom’s 2022-23 budget proposal, which includes a slew of important health care initiatives. 

CHA Alert Urges Representatives to Ask Federal Agencies to Investigate Anticompetitive Conduct of Nurse Staffing Agencies

CHA has issued an alert encouraging hospitals to urge their U.S. representative to sign on to a bipartisan “Dear Colleague” letter led by Reps. Peter Welch (D-VT) and Morgan Griffith (R-VA). The letter asks the White House to enlist the support of federal agencies to investigate reports of anticompetitive behavior from nurse staffing agencies.

Hospitals: Final Step to Expand Coverage for All Included in January Budget Proposal Will Deliver Care to Millions

“Governor Newsom’s budget proposal to expand health care coverage to all income-eligible adults ages 26-49 regardless of immigration status is the final step needed to ensure that California becomes the first state in the nation to achieve universal health care coverage,” said Carmela Coyle, President & CEO of the California Hospital Association. “Delivering coverage for […]