Workforce

About Workforce

California’s shortage of health care workers, which was already struggling to keep pace with the growing demand for services before the pandemic, has only been exacerbated by COVID-19. Statewide, more than 11 million Californians live in an area without enough primary care providers. These patients often face a health care system lacking enough nurses, physicians, pharmacists, behavioral health professionals, lab scientists, geriatric specialists, and physical therapists to provide the care they need. To care for patients across the state, California needs to add 500,000 new allied health care professionals — such as medical assistants, imaging specialists, and other non-nursing staff — by 2024.   

Health care offers Californians solid career paths with upward mobility and economic stability, and each year hospitals invest millions of dollars in training California’s next generation of health care providers. But closing the gaps will require partnerships among all who recognize the need to protect the health of Californians: employers, workers, policymakers, colleges, licensing entities, and others. Regulatory changes are needed to improve efficiency and transparency in licensing, address limitations on scope of practice, and enhance education and training for nurses and nurse assistants.  

CDPH Laboratory Field Services Changes License Delivery System

As of June 18, the California Department of Public Health’s Laboratory Field Services (LFS) is using a new method to deliver licenses and certificates for laboratory personnel, allowing them to download and print active licenses directly from the online system. LFS will no longer mail licenses, and licensees will no longer need to request or pay for a duplicate license.

CHA Campaign Advances Solutions for California’s Health Care Workforce Shortages

In an effort to reinforce to lawmakers the need to address California’s severe health care workforce shortages, CHA just completed a month-long social media campaign to position hospitals’ leadership role in developing the current and future health workforce. Developed as a catalyst for more funding and enactment of key policy recommendations ahead of the state budget deadline in June, the campaign included an opinion editorial issued jointly with the California Primary Care Association, a video produced in collaboration with Sharp HealthCare, and an issue brief developed specifically for state legislators.

CHA Supports Resident Physician Shortage Act of 2019

CHA sent a letter to the California congressional delegation this week, urging support of the Resident Physician Shortage Act of 2019 (H.R. 1763), which takes steps to reduce nationwide physician shortages by increasing the number of Medicare-supported residency positions.

CHA Supports Commission’s Recommendations to Grow, Diversify California’s Health Care Workforce

Expanding education and training, increasing diversity, and boosting capacity are crucial steps for ensuring California’s health care workforce can meet patient needs into the future, especially in underserved communities, according to a newly released report from the California Future Health Workforce Commission. CHA supports the commission’s 30 recommendations and the path it outlines to develop a workforce prepared to meet critical future needs.