Health Equity

About Health Equity

Disparate health outcomes for Californians are often the result of historic and systemic inequalities that persist today. Unequal access to health care and health resources, as well as unequal and damaging environmental conditions due to race, socioeconomic status, and other factors is untenable in a just and healthy society. That’s why California’s hospitals are committed to ensuring every Californian receives equitable, high-quality care through programs that address the social determinants of health — things like housing instability, access to healthy foods, and community violence. But hospitals alone cannot eliminate health disparities. It will take systemic reform, paired with broad partnerships across all segments of California’s communities, to improve the status quo.

Kaiser Permanente’s Thrive Local: Connecting Patients to Critical Community Resources — Participant Information

When patients leave the hospital, there’s usually some healing ahead. More often than not, special services or assistance are needed to help recovery — crucial resources that may be lacking for vulnerable populations.   Kaiser Permanente’s Thrive Local was developed to address these needs. Thrive Local features a community referral network that integrates health systems, […]

Abundance of Revenue May Trigger State Spending Limits

Even though the state will bring in billions of dollars in surplus revenue this year, its ability to spend those additional dollars may be more limited than it has been for many years. This unique challenge facing the Legislature and administration as they craft the 2022-23 state budget is being driven by a voter-approved requirement in the state Constitution. 

Care for All Means Care for ALL

Our state is home to nearly 11 million immigrants, more than any other in the nation, and immigrants account for 28% of California’s population. Policies that sow fear or confusion among our immigrant communities are antithetical and detrimental to the mission of hospitals: Caring for the sick and healing the injured, regardless of a patient’s ethnicity or citizenship status.