Our Health California

CHA’s Coyle Discusses Behavioral Health With Governor’s Mental Health Czar

Tom Insel, MD, behavioral health advisor to Gov. Gavin Newsom, recently sat down for a one-on-one conversation with CHA’s President & CEO Carmela Coyle to discuss behavioral health care challenges across California’s 58 counties. The two discussed fundamental impediments to access to care, including lack of capacity, behavioral health care workforce shortages, getting patients the right care in the right setting, and hospitals’ role in caring for patients’ physical and behavioral health care needs.

Prep Like a Hospital

Disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes, and tornadoes can happen to anyone, anywhere, at any time. It’s during these types of events that you can look to hospitals to lead by example.

Mary Massey, California Hospital Association’s Vice President of Emergency Management, is a pivotal force in ensuring that California hospitals have everything they need to endure the worst. Here, she outlines those steps for us, and we help you take them into your own home so you can prep like a hospital…click here to read more. 

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Know before you go (home)

The goal of any hospital stay is to be healthy enough to go home — and when that moment finally comes, it’s often met with relief and excitement. 

Few things can temper that excitement quicker than being readmitted within the following 30 days. For many of these patients, this can be attributed to a lack of proper aftercare. Don’t let the excitement of going home distract you from getting the information you need to stay at home. 

Ensure you’re on the road to a full recovery by asking your doctor for the following information before you get discharged – Click here to read more. 

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Healthy Minds Datagrams

In communities across California, and across the country, mental health conditions are prevalent. But for too many, mental health care is inaccessible — or stigmatized. In fact, of the 6 million in our state that experience mental health issues, only 1 out of 3 will get the treatment they need.

Author
  • Tracy Campbell, APR
    Assistant Group Vice President, Communications